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Melvin balancing his second-base hopefuls

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Melvin balancing his second-base hopefuls play video for Melvin balancing his second-base hopefuls

PHOENIX -- Each day there are only nine innings to be shared by six second-base candidates, forcing manager Bob Melvin to do his best balancing act.

On Monday he was able to get all six playing time in the A's 6-5 loss to the Mariners, with Scott Sizemore, Jed Lowrie, Eric Sogard, Jemile Weeks, Adam Rosales and Andy Parrino accounting for 13 of the club's 32 at-bats.

Not all of them drew time at second base, though. Sizemore played all nine innings there, going 1-for-4 along the way. Rosales started at shortstop and collected a base hit, Lowrie went 0-for-2 at third base and Weeks got his three at-bats -- and one hit -- as the designated hitter.

"That's just a way to get Jemile some at-bats," Melvin said. "A way to try to get everyone in there. I would say the middle infield is the one that's more in flux. There are a lot of guys playing well, and my guess is that it will play out for a while."

Indeed, this sounds familiar, and the subject is almost assuredly to be broached daily.

Sogard, almost on cue, collected a double in his only at-bat off the bench -- his seventh of the spring -- to raise his average to .516.

"I'd almost be scared I'd never get a hit again if I was going that well," Melvin joked. "He's really seeing the ball well."

Parrino went 0-for-1 and subbed in left field.

Melvin may very well be tempted to send a few of these infielders to play in Minor League games in an effort to get them more at-bats.

Jane Lee is a reporter for MLB.com. Read her blog, Major Lee-ague, and follow her on Twitter @JaneMLB. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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